John Byrne
 
 
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John Byrne
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John Byrne
I came across two websites which may be of interest to the Crew (you may already have read them of course) The first is a CSIRO report on the values of property close to groundwater sources http://www.clw.csiro.au/publications/waterforahealthycountry/2007/wfhc_valueurbanwetlands.pdf This is another report which stresses the importance of the best practice method of assessing management and development of the mound. An abstract is here: The simulation paradigm is now considered to be the best approach because simulation models can be more representative of reality and many of the decision variables are not under full control of the stakeholders. If the optimisation paradigm can be used, decisions would be assumed on behalf of other stakeholders. Therefore, optimisation will lead to isolation of the other stakeholders in the water resources planning process, rather than their involvement. Furthermore, dynamic simulation is much more transparent compared to optimisation techniques, which allows the user to understand the interaction and relationships among the different variables, especially the variables related to people. Apart from the difficulty of merging data and pieces of information of a diverse nature (often qualitative and incomplete) two other reasons prevail. The first is the need to comply with vast numbers of rules and regulations that are related to water resources planning and management but often are not provided in an integrated, harmonised and rational framework. The second reason is the increasing claim for community participation in decision-making processes. In summary, our view is that the most fruitful approach is to use computer-based tools (DSS) to predict and assess the effects of any actions by performing an integrated analysis of environmental and socio-economic aspects. Doesn’t sound like our government has read it? http://www.mssanz.org.au/modsim09/I11/elmahdi_I11.pdf A good turn out for the march today, well organised (three of our family attended) our thanks to the organisers and Crew who must have worked tirelessly over the last couple of months, it’s a great credit to them. The report on 'The Wests' website reads like a Paul Miles spin.
 
 
106 months ago
John Byrne I came across two websites which may be of interest to the Crew (you may already have read them of course) The first is a CSIRO report on the values of property close to groundwater sources http://www.clw.csiro.au/publications/waterforahealthycountry/2007/wfhc_valueurbanwetlands.pdf This is another report which stresses the importance of the best practice method of assessing management and development of the mound. An abstract is here: The simulation paradigm is now considered to be the best approach because simulation models can be more representative of reality and many of the decision variables are not under full control of the stakeholders. If the optimisation paradigm can be used, decisions would be assumed on behalf of other stakeholders. Therefore, optimisation will lead to isolation of the other stakeholders in the water resources planning process, rather than their involvement. Furthermore, dynamic simulation is much more transparent compared to optimisation techniques, which allows the user to understand the interaction and relationships among the different variables, especially the variables related to people. Apart from the difficulty of merging data and pieces of information of a diverse nature (often qualitative and incomplete) two other reasons prevail. The first is the need to comply with vast numbers of rules and regulations that are related to water resources planning and management but often are not provided in an integrated, harmonised and rational framework. The second reason is the increasing claim for community participation in decision-making processes. In summary, our view is that the most fruitful approach is to use computer-based tools (DSS) to predict and assess the effects of any actions by performing an integrated analysis of environmental and socio-economic aspects. Doesn’t sound like our government has read it? http://www.mssanz.org.au/modsim09/I11/elmahdi_I11.pdf A good turn out for the march today, well organised (three of our family attended) our thanks to the organisers and Crew who must have worked tirelessly over the last couple of months, it’s a great credit to them. The report on 'The Wests' website reads like a Paul Miles spin. Mar 06
 
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Environmental Quote

"Let every individual and institution now think and act as a responsible trustee of Earth, seeking choices in ecology, economics and ethics that will provide a sustainable future, eliminate pollution, poverty and violence, awaken the wonder of life and foster peaceful progress in the human adventure."

— John McConnell, founder of International Earth Day

Social Quote

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